Forge forward in hope, faith, and love and find a new way of living.

Forge forward in hope, faith, and love and find a new way of living.

I love Psalm 23 has been such strength since I came to faith in Christ well over 30 years ago.

The Psalm is commonly believed to be just about death; however, it’s a lot more than just a cute funeral poem. Although the context is often misunderstood, I use the Psalm as a template for coping with everyday problems.

Psalm 23 is a metaphoric story of our journey through life and a guide to comfort and strengthen us in our dark valleys. This wonderful Psalm assures us that God is our friend who is shepherding us through our pain. In the middle of suffering, God promises to be always there.

David wrote this Psalm, which appears to be his own personal experience of God as his Shepherd. He declares that God provides, and he paints a beautiful picture of the excellent care that God gives amid suffering. 

When David was a shepherd, his job was to look after the pregnant ewes (Ps 78:70,71). He knew first-hand of the care and tender warmth of a good shepherd towards his flock. One day David risked his life to rescue a lamb, illustrating God’s respect for every individual. 

Jesus Christ, our Saviour, seems to refer to this when He says, ‘I am the shepherd of the sheep the good shepherd’ John 10:11. We know the familiar story of when Jesus left the ninety-nine sheep to search for that lost one. A good shepherd guides his sheep into the fold and then cares, protects, and provides for them because they are his. The sheep knows Shepherd’s voice, and they follow him.

 When looking into Psalm 23 to use at a funeral that I was leading, I noticed that the process of going through the valley is like journeying through grief. Since then, I often refer to it at funeral serves and worship meetings, and at times, people say they feel really helped. 

 I really like and appreciate this Psalm because it allows us to understand how much God loves us. Father God is omnipresent, which means God is present everywhere at once. This is possible through the work of the Holy Trinity.

I have never been rich; however, I have lacked nothing from the time I committed my life to Christ, even during the dark valley of grief. In the middle of grieving, God has enabled me to lie down in green pastures, not striving or worrying, but lying down, chilling out in the greenness of God’s love. 

Often, I feel his guidance, albeit a still small voice, impression, or wise advice. Even though I have often strayed from the designated path, as we all do from time to time, I have been gently guided back. Sometimes I have been returned kicking and screaming, realising much later that the momentary discipline from God saved me. Through it all, God is there. You may feel in despair right now, but don’t worry; you will come through this because your Shepherd is walking with you through all the grief and pain.

Each of us has a choice, to either deal with bereavement and the grief it brings, or crawl under a rock somewhere and hide from it, and even worse, we could pretend it is not there. 

I read psychology and counselling at the University of Derby, UK, on a master’s level. It was an excellent course because I became better equipped to help those I ministered to and counselled. The spin-off was that it helped me in my personal life immensely. It was one of the ways God restored and healed me from past emotional trauma. 

Through the course, I experienced many cathartic moments- green pastures. I must admit that I have no unique gifts on walking through grief, but I have God in Christ. I give thanks from the depths of my being because Creator God has held my hand all the way and guided me through that dark valley, showing me how to live in it, emerging victorious. As I sojourned with God through the darkness, I had peace in my heart because I knew that God was with me. And you know what? God is with you as well and can bring you through the darkest of valleys.

I discovered that God heals is not the way I would expect; his ways are higher than ours. God did not just magically wave the sorrow away as if it did not exist. He did not rescue me from it but taught me how to get through it, and to journey through the valley. As for God, his way is perfect; the word of the LORD is proven; He is a shield to all who trust in Him (Psalm 18.30). But, Gods ways are certainly a lot different from ours.

Father God taught me how to say goodbye to many relationships and people in all circumstances. Eventually, I learned how to grieve appropriately, how to move on. I do not boast that I have cracked it because each situation is unique.

 Each experience of grief is different from your previous experience. I am sure there will be new challenges ahead and victories to be won. So, let’s forge forward in hope, faith, and love and find a new way of living, a new normal.

What method do you use to manage your grief? Let me know, and I would love to hear from you in our comments section below. 

If you want some ideas and tools to relieve and manage stress, check out the course on the home page.

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How to abide in God part 3

Hope. Faith. Love Fosters a sense of community. All Blog posts are there for your encouragement and to share with others. You will find all kinds of topics relevant to everyday life.

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John 15:4-11 New King James Version

Abide in Me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in Me.”I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in Me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without Me, you can do nothing. If anyone does not abide in Me, he is cast out as a branch and is withered; and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned. If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you. By this My Father is glorified that you bear much fruit; so, you will be My disciples.

 So, to understand what Abiding really means, we need to take a brief look at the three main points to Jesus message while on earth –

  1. First, the kingdom of God and its coming. In a previous YouTube video & blog post
  1. Second, God the Father and the infinite value of the human soul. In a previous YouTube video & blog post
  1. Third, the higher righteousness and the commandment of love. In this YouTube video and blog post

 This post will address the third and final point- the kingdom of God and it’s coming. What has this got to do with Abiding in God?- keep reading to find out!

Some folk think that God is ‘up there’ or ‘out there’. This kind of thinking stops you from coming into a relationship with God. If God is up there’ then he’s not ‘here’ with you. God is distant from you, and you are strangers. Therefore, you presume that you must attain something special to reach the God who is ‘up there’. There’s Great News!! The kingdom is not ‘out there’ somewhere; it has come to you through Jesus Christ – now all you need to do is accept it and live in it. There is no need for complicated routines or special spiritual qualifications. When we accept Jesus as our Lord and Saviour, we become a part of his kingdom; we are of his family. His presence, power, and peace live inside of us! What a gift God gives us when he sends his son to usher onto the earth God’s kingdom and uses you to do it! Jesus explains this to us in the Gospel of John, chapter 3. Please read all the chapter to get the overall idea. And you will find the teaching in my YouTube video and in an earlier blog post.

Because the kingdom is in you, you can abide in God, which means to abide in love. God is righteous and is the very essence of love. If you abide in Jesus, who is love, you will bear fruit of the same. So we will now briefly look at HOW you can abide in this God of love. When Jesus ministered on earth, he encouraged us to cast our burdens upon him. Jesus captures the core of your hurt, the frustration of feeling alone and abandoned to himself. God promises to help you. Take Him at His word. Using your imagination, see that God is with you and using faith, believe that you are not alone. Someone is there; love itself is there. The Lord replied:

My precious, precious child, I love you, and I would never, never leave you during your times of trial and suffering. When you saw only one set of footprints, it was then that I carried you.

Footprints in the Sand- Mary Stevenson

To engage with this is called having faith. Right now, stop and drink in His love and peace, be still, take a slow, deep breath and breathe out…. And move into the below reflection…..

  • Repeat the reading over until you feel peace in your soul. It’s not a quick fix; take your time. But more than feeling the comfort, you are engaging with the warmth of God. 
  • Now, as the despair or doubt begins to dissipate, allow it to give way to faith and abiding in God. Now, open your eyes and take a good look around once again; take in your surroundings. Appreciate what you see and begin to re-focus. – take your time as you come to the end of the reflection.
  • At the end of your reflection upon that reading, offer a short prayer of thanksgiving and praise. Practice this reflection several times over a period; it is there for you to dip into whenever you need to.    

The next time you’re feeling frantic and stressed, and you’re wondering how you’re going to make it through the day, open the door to Christ, ponder upon Psalm 23. God, who is your Shepherd, who is the very essence of love, is ready to embrace and walk with you, abide in you through the darkest valley. God is anointing your head with oil (healing balm) your cup overflows (you have more than you need). Your eyes adjust to the darkness of the valley and find that you cannot see God, but you just know God is there, and you are abiding in him. 

Psalm 23 makes powerful declarations of the love, care and provision God has for those who choose to follow Him. Allow God the Shepherd to guide you along His paths, knowing He has everything in hand. 

I live in South Wales UK, if you need any services or have any questions please feel free to email me at info@paularoseministries.org

 In the meantime Jesus loves you, so Live Life on Purpose in Hope. Faith. Love,

Rev Paula 💕

My Blog posts are part of Paula Rose Parish Ministries for your encouragement.

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Coping with loss at Christmas Time

There is Nothing Good about Grief, particularly at Christmas time. When grief strikes at the heart, the effects send us reeling into bereavement. We are drawn into a vortex of loss, and it can feel like that we cannot escape. This experience is familiar to us all, vortex of loss, and we get hurt. Sometimes our grief is left unresolved. What can you do when When grief strikes at the heart What happens when you find yourself in one of the darkest periods of your life which can feel like the valley of the shadow of death? During COVID-19 pandemic we have suffered loss, changing our lives forever. How can you cope when your whole life is turned upside down and all that is familiar and held dear is There is Hope-?


I have written a book for the Bereaved called- Nothing Good about Grief . If you are a person of faith, or no faith, or somewhere in between, this book is a little ray of light and hope. Perhaps you are supporting someone whom you know is grieved, or just want to research the topic, then this book is for you. Like everyone else on the planet, I have experienced the dark valley of mourning.

Change is all about us these days, and our reality is vastly different from a few months ago. Suddenly we all have become very vulnerable. The world is experiencing an unprecedented catastrophe. Collectively, we weep and grieve. The worldwide pandemic of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) is still a reality for us all. This unforeseen disaster has swiftly taken the lives of loved ones, leaving the grieving disillusioned and struggling to make sense of it all. During the government-imposed lockdown, people lost livelihoods, assets, and social freedoms. The economy, families and marriages were all under great strain. People living together every day and night, with no respite, has caused domestic abuse to rise sharply across the world. Families lived in fear of loved ones who were meant to care and protect them. Basic daily needs became increasingly challenging to meet, and many others became homeless. We stayed home to stay safe, while daily routines and lifestyles were turned upside down. Restricted freedom of movement caused much psychological strain, and people felt hemmed in. Sadly, for some, suicide was the only way out. The losses have been incalculable, unbearable, and extraordinary. Every human being on the planet shared a sense of unspeakable loss, collective grief, and we are left bereaved. Nothing will be the same again. What will the future look like? The good news is that all is not lost.


There is Hope– Within the beautiful images of the 23rd Psalm, we will find the way forward and by applying its truth’s we have a sure and certain hope for a happy future. Through all the grief and pain, the Shepherd is walking with you, leading you on the right path to recovery. Grief is a natural reaction to loss. Bereavement is the process we go through when we grieve. Being a member of humanity means we walk through dark valleys throughout our lives. As described in Psalm 23, some of those valleys may feel like we are passing through death itself, dramatically changing our reality forever.

We try to express to others how we are feeling. Careworn, we fail to find the words that accurately describe our pain. No one can take away our grief. We feel alone. The devastation of our anguish is not apparent but is visible to the heart. Finding a pathway through can be complicated. There is certainly Nothing Good about Grief! My book will help you to understand and articulate what you are experiencing, and to come to terms with what is happening. The thoughts and ideas I present are the results of forty years of my personal and professional experience and theological understanding. When we are grieving a weighty book is challenging to cope with; therefore, I have written it as an easy read.

Part One is the preamble to later sections. Do not skip through this because this will prepare you for your journey.Part Two is devoted to defining grief and bereavement, understanding what the symptoms of three phases of grief are, and why we feel as we do.Part Three supplies a three-phased guide of recovery and discovering pathways into the new light of day. Part Four provides simple ways to recovery through reflections and guidelines. Part Five will help you make the adjustments you need and assist you on your journey, keeping you on the path to maintain your recovery.


From a therapeutic point of view, to help with grief recovery, I offer a Phased Approach because no one grieves in the same way as you do. Your bereavement is particular to how you feel and react to your grief. I see the term Phase as a statement of hope. The symptoms of grief outlined here in this book are well documented. However, the difference is that I have developed the phased approach because it is flexible, while using Psalm 23 as a guide. A phase is a period in your life, it is fleeting, it does not last. The symptoms of your grief I have outlined are Shock, Suffering and Anger/resentment. As you move through these into recovery, these symptoms will not last. You will eventually fully recover to enjoy life again. A phase denotes qualities that refer to time, a stage and flexibility, softness, and gracefulness. It is not fixed or rigid and can be adapted to each need. On the other hand, the process or step method is the opposite of that of the phased approach. It does not allow for individuality, fundamentally inflexible with a specified way of doing things for everyone. I see the three phases as a prescription of care, in the sense of a remedy and will bring you through to recovery. And like any prescription, the right dose is required for recovery. If you take more than is prescribed, the effects will be damaging. If you do not take enough, the remedy will be ineffectual. If you take someone else’s dose, there will be a problem. For each person, the dosage is different depending on a whole host of factors. That is why each prescription has only your name on it. The three phases are the same, they have your name on it. Utilizing the phased approach, instead, of following steps, or a process method is more realistic, so you can move at your own pace and just far more darn right kinder!

For over 40 years, and over several countries, I have worked as a church leader and professional counsellor. I have had the privilege of helping hundreds of hurting people through the dark valley of grief, into recovery. Nothing Good About Grief is available on Amazon, on this web site you will find a links to the UK Amazon. I have many followers from around the world so, if you are from another country, just Put the book title and my name- Paula Rose Parish- in the Amazon browser and you’ll be sure to find it. If you cant. Contact me and I can make arrangements to get a book sent you.

If you need Counselling, I am available for Telephone or Online Therapy.

We will journey together while learning that you have a Shepherd who leads you on. Your Shepherd who understands, and weeps for your pain, is calling you into His love and mercy.

Every Blessing

Paula Rose- Parish

TASTER 1 – Psalm 23 Unwrapped

Hello, I am editing my new book Psalm 23 Unwrapped which will be published on Amazon in December, ready to order for a Christmas gift. This book will be a wonderful lift to someone spirits, giving them hope in difficult times. Watch out for it in mid- December on Amazon.

Taster One

New Book available on Amazon in mid December 2020!

Psalm 23 Unwrapped

Introduction

This little book is a compliment to Nothing Good about Grief, which will help you to let go of your grief and to recover to find your joy. Psalm 23 is a very special Psalm and will help you to guide you through your grief. Through this study we see how the Lord is our Good Shepherd, our Protector, our daily Provider, our Peace, Rest, and our Guide in every circumstance. We experience God’s faithfulness, and find Hope in the darkest of times.

We search far and wide in this COVID-19 world to find peace, solace, and contentment. Sifting through daily issues, dealing with family matters, crisis, worry, anxiety, and stress have all become part and parcel of the life we live. Nevertheless, this is not unique to our times. History offers us narratives of vast difficulty, struggles and unrest.

Has God abandoned us? Is he deaf to our cries? Does he care that we need help? Or has he separated himself from the affairs of humankind? In this little book, you will find to the contrary. Here, you will unwrap the nature and purpose of God for your life. Your faith will come alive, bringing new hope, vision, and purpose. Your understanding of God will open up, helping you to abide in hope, faith, and love.

I offer two versions of this Psalm to help you to grasp its fuller meaning. It reminds us that there is rest for the weary, healing and anointing. There is comfort and restoration for those in His care, even in times of pandemic. If you are in need, grieving a loss, facing the onslaughts of the enemy or even death itself, read each verse thoughtfully and you will come to understand God’s immense love for you. God is not indifferent to your tears, your fears, or your cares. The next time you’re feeling frantic and stressed, and you’re wondering how you’re going to make it through the day, remember Psalm 23. Allow God the Shepherd to guide you along His paths, knowing He has everything in control and all you need to do is to trust and follow. The Shepherd knows your destination, he will help you get there.  Your green pastures and still waters are closer than you think.

Amplified Bible (AMP)

 1 The Lord is my Shepherd [to feed, guide, and shield me], I shall not lack.

2 He makes me lie down in [fresh, tender] green pastures; He leads me beside the still and restful waters.

3 He refreshes and restores my life (myself); He leads me in the paths of righteousness [uprightness and right standing with Him—not for my earning it, but] for His name’s sake.

 4 Yes, though I walk through the [deep, sunless] valley of the shadow of death, I will fear or dread no evil, for You are with me; Your rod [to protect] and Your staff [to guide], they comfort me.

 5 You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my [brimming] cup runs over.

 6 Surely or only goodness, mercy, and unfailing love shall follow me all the days of my life, and through the length of my days the house of the Lord [and His presence] shall be my dwelling place.

Common English Bible (CEB)

1 The LORD is my shepherd. I lack nothing.

2 He lets me rest in grassy meadows; he leads me to restful waters.

3 He keeps me alive. He guides me in proper paths for the sake of his good name.

4 Even when I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no danger because you are with me. Your rod and your staff— they protect me.

5 You set a table for me right in front of my enemies. You bathe my head in oil; my cup is so full it spills over!

 6 Yes, goodness and faithful love will pursue me all the days of my life, and I will live in the LORD’s house as long as I live.

I encourage you to Take notes. Jot down your thoughts and ideas as they come to you. Note your memories of that these pages have evoked. Write down your goals, projects, and tasks that this book has brought to mind.

 I want this book to be a very practical one for you. It is not a story book but one you can use repeatedly to help you through the tough times in your life.

if you are sincerely searching for God, pick up my book in December, you will find what you are looking for as revealed in the 23rd Psalm.

Thank you for reading this post, if it has been helpful- I would love to hear from you so please let me know –

info@paularoseparishministries.org.

It is my hope to help others to LiveLife on Purpose in Hope Faith and Love. Paula Rose Parish x

Also find me at : www. wellhabits.blogspot

Traces of Grief

Do you see me_image

Traces of grief may always remain, it changed me,

                             the real victory is not in the deleting the effects,

                                                but in the triumphing over them.            Paula Rose-Parish

When we plan to take a journey of some kind, we take time to prepare. We are savvy travellers, so we ensure that we have our navigation tools in hand, ensuring that they work as they should. We then become familiar with them before we get on the road. The visit to the fuel station guarantees that we will complete our journey. If we don’t, there is a good chance of getting lost, taking a detour, or not getting to our intended destination at all. Now we have a goal, we have a plan, we are ready to begin our journey. Approach this chapter in this same way. Use it as a preparation for your journey through this book. It will get you started on the path to recovery. I write in a particular way, and in this chapter, I reveal why. The usage of the Psalm and my specific application of words are explained. When we are bereaved, we can get exhausted. Therefore, I want this journey through grief to be straightforward as it possibly can be for you.

I am a child of the 50s and have seen a lot of life. I’ve lived and worked in four countries and visited a whole lot of others. The journey through life, from the very beginning to end, make us who we are. I must have been about ten years old when my very favourite saying became ‘Good Grief Charlie Brown!’ I would say it all the time, and it became somewhat of a trademark for me, it was my catchphrase. I didn’t know that I had dyslexia (not diagnosed until in my late 40s). Dyslexia was unknown within the educational system at the time. Therefore, there was no provision for remedial teaching. Without the support I needed, I hadn’t read a book in full until I was well into my 20s. Reading exhausted me, so I gave up in the first few pages, unable to comprehend the storyline, context or the words. Thinking back, I seriously tried my hardest at school, but not everyone saw it that way. I could read a little bit, but not enough to keep up with my grades. My teachers reported to my parents that I was lazy, which would add to my overwhelming sense of failure. Tearfully I shouted, ‘I am trying, I just can’t read, I just can’t’, and they would fire back at me ‘there’s no such word as can’t’ and told me to try harder. I was doing so badly that I had to repeat grade two twice! Then I failed in every year of primary school as well. I didn’t have the grades I need to attend high school, but because I was older than my peers; I was ‘put up’ to secondary school – as they called it. To be expected, I was put in the lowest set. Having an awful time, I only lasted there for six months; leaving in favour of the workplace at the age of fifteen years old. Try as I might, I just didn’t get hold of what was going on in the classroom. I couldn’t follow the thread of ideas, and the bullies duly took advantage of my weakness.

On several occasions, a group of boys and girls were waiting for me at the school gate and chased me all the way home after roughing me up. Growing up in the Australian school system in the 1950s and 60s wasn’t easy. We had to be tough enough to defend ourselves when needed. And it would always help of course if you were a fast runner, and I was. My inferiority heightened when my classmates and family devoured books like they were going out of fashion. They would tell me how easy it was to read, so why couldn’t I? Feeling very alone and misunderstood, I began to withdraw into myself. No way would I visit the school library except for a compulsory session in class. I didn’t understand why I had to attend the library when I couldn’t read properly. The whole system confused me. I quickly became overwhelmed by the hundreds of books housed on myriads of intimidating shelves.

Then one day, while trying to avoid the bullies, and I found myself wandering into the school library, and it was there that I discovered a small book. It was brief enough that I managed to read it almost to the end. I loved that little book, with its cute cartoons on every page which portrayed the adventures of Charlie Brown. I liked Charlie, he was an unusual little boy, and I found that I could relate to him, bless him. In Charlie, there was a small reflection of myself. Like me, Charlie was of short stature, inconspicuous, ordinary, and unremarkable. And like me, he was misunderstood. Charlie had a habit of making silly mistakes, he would say stupid things and did things out of the ordinary, and that is when his friends would exclaim, Good Grief Charlie Brown! I definitely could relate to him.

I suffered my first real experience of grief when I split from my fiancé of three years. I was still saying ‘good grief’ as my catchphrasebut now I knew that grief had nothing GOOD about it. In the end, my favourite little motto became a thing of the past -sorry Charlie! Whether it’s death, divorce a job loss or anything else that causes us to grieve, all are difficult to cope with. Whatever the circumstances, grief forces us to say goodbye to someone or something we hold dear. Grieving is such a personal and individual thing; we all experience it in our own way. I remember the sorrow I felt when I left my home country of Australia, creating a new home overseas. The anguish of saying goodbye to family. My obligations in ministry took me around the world, so I repeatedly had to leave dear friends behind, and sadness became a familiar figure. I was living 15,000 miles away from Australia, when my mother, who lived there died. I felt sad when I couldn’t be with her in her last days. The sorrow deepened when I couldn’t help my sisters to care for our aged Dad – there’s nothing good about grief.

You, Will, Have Troubles

  I share a little my own story throughout this book, so you know that you are not alone in this. I want you to see that there is someone who can empathise. My purpose is to help you understand your own Troubles and learn to manage them, so you can live a happy and fulfilling life. No real language exists, that clearly expresses the reality of the deep pain of grief. In 1976 I came to faith in Christ and began to attend church and was told by well-meaning people, that all my problems have ended.

I believed them. They assured me that I had found a trouble-free life! It wasn’t long before I found out that this idea was terribly dishonest. When the problems began, I was convinced that something was wrong with me. This wasn’t supposed to happen! Discouraged and very confused, I believed that I must have done something wrong, it was my fault somehow. I already had low self-esteem, and this only compounded my sense of helplessness and hopelessness. My God encounter was genuine. I hung on tightly to that experience as the turmoil swirled around me. I began to research God’s word for myself and found the truth of the matter. What I was told was a lie, things do go wrong for people of faith. Bad things happen to good people. And that is OK, that’s life! Every human being on the planet lives through sorrow in different ways and measures, and always will. You can imagine my relief to find this was nothing unusual and that there was nothing wrong with me after all. Many teachings in the Scriptures point out that we will have troubles in this life, especially if we follow Christ closely as His disciples.  Don’t be surprised by what you are experiencing, God is with you. The real problem arises when we don’t know what to do with our troubles. We wonder how on earth will we get through this! And how do we survive this phase of mourning, and not allow it to immobilise us in some way? How can we make sense of what is happening?

 In God’s Name

To be able to embrace God as a friend as we journey through the valley of the shadow, we need to identify who God actually is. One of the ways we do this is by looking into His Name. This is because God’s Name reveals His character, intention, and fundamental nature. When we name our children, we give them a first and surname, and sometimes more. And we often don’t consider what the meaning of it may be. However, this rule does not apply to God. Meanings of names are particularly important. The babies of the bible were named according to the particular meaning of that name.  Some people may not realise it but, there is no first name or surname that is applied to the Creator of the Universe. God is not a John or an Eric or even a Fred, for example. But what we believe are names for God are actually descriptions of Gods nature, character, and actions. For instance, Jehovah-Raah, which means The Lord, my Shepherd. A shepherd is a role description, not a name of a person. Jehovah is not a name either. Translated as The Existing One or Lord. So again, it describes who God is. Also, it suggests becoming or specifically to become known. This implies that God always discloses who He is. A shepherd is the one who feeds or leads his flock to pasture (Ezekiel 34:11-15). An extended translation is a friend or companion. This indicates the intimacy that God desires between Himself and His people and can be understood as The Lord, my Friend. Untangling the Name like this reveals to us that God is our friend, guide, companion and is the ever-existing One. The One who loves and cares for His sheep. The Lord, my Shepherd.and we see who God is in the Good Shepherd who is Jesus Christ.

💗xx

 If you need help please contact me :

          info@paularoseparishministries.org