How to Prepare for Death- talk about it.

It’s 2022 and the COVID variants are still with us. Healthy people are dying from this dreaded virus every single day. For example, today, I learnt of a perfectly healthy 19-year-old who had died within 48 hours of not feeling well. The autopsy revealed it was COVID related. 

Later in the day, I received another call about the news of a young mum with two tiny toddlers. She tested positive for COVID 19, and she felt a bit unwell but was still walking around independently. However, her doctor decided to admit her to the hospital. As the young mum settled into her hospital bed, the nurse attending her asked how she felt. She said, “I feel a little bit unwell, but apart from that, I have no other symptoms”. Unfortunately, the next day she passed away. 

On hearing this sad news of these two people who suddenly died, my heart immediately went out to these dear families who are faced with one of the worst tragedies of their lives. My Dad passed away recently, the death of a loved one is hard enough to bear when you are aware that they have but a short time to live. However, no one has time to prepare emotionally for such a horrible event when it is totally out of the blue. 

At such times, it often happens that the loved ones who are left behind are so shocked by this event they either want to freeze, flight or fight the situation. Shock is a terrible state to deal with, especially if you don’t realise that you’re actually in shock. I have a section in my book “Nothing Good about Grief, shown below, which explains what shock is and how to recognise it in yourself.

Yet, in a state of shock, the loved one is expected to deal with all legalities and funeral arrangements, leaving no time to reflect or grieve. Just after a loved one dies and the body is released, each day becomes filled with notifying banks, social services, employers, collecting death certificates, notifying utility services, etc. In addition, one might be faced with arranging the care of any children left behind, not to mention any pets. Then there is the heart-breaking task of notifying friends and family of the death of the one that you dearly loved and wonder how you do without them. 

The funeral arrangements alone are a massive task because one is not prepared for this and perhaps has never experienced dealing with these kinds of things before. All these tasks and others are terribly time-consuming, exhausting, and sleep does not come easy. Finally, the day of the funeral arrives totally exhausted from the previous week’s events the loved one feels as if they have hit a milestone. They are perhaps comforted with the words. It will be over soon. But in reality, no words are sufficient to bring the comfort of any kind. 

What most people dread is the funeral service itself. Family and friends gather around, paying respect to their loved ones, and as the funeral service progresses, the reality of the situation is revealed, a loved one has died and will not be coming back. The day after the funeral, the loved one who is left greets not only a new day but a new lifestyle and, for many, a totally new life entirely. Now without the hustle and bustle of arranging this, and arranging that, notifying this person notifying that person is behind them, then suddenly everything comes to a standstill. Busyness does not wind down slowly but ends the day after the funeral abruptly. Here, the shock is compounded, and one may ask, what shall I do now?

None of us wishes to face the reality of death, particularly in our western culture, where we tend to tuck it away, and it is never a topic of conversation. Unfortunately, not discussing what will happen in our own death has become a cultural norm and is not helpful in times of tragedy. When we are mentally and emotionally prepared for an event, we can cope with it a lot better than when we are not prepared.

We need to talk about death & Dying

Conversing around the dinner table about death and dying prepares us all mentally and emotionally for the inevitable, however distasteful we might find it. There are many other cultures that death is part of living and is celebrated in ways that support good mental health, and we should learn from them. None of us can be prepared for sudden death. However, we can prepare for the eventuality that our loved ones and ourselves will eventually die one day. 

Over the last 40 years, I have done countless funerals and supported many grieving families. I have found that those who have arranged instructions for their funeral are more likely to openly and naturally talk about death than those who don’t prepare. 

It is evident to me those people who have prepared for their funerals mentally, emotionally, and taken some action, like choosing their hymns, readings, where they want the funeral to be etc. In this case, the loved ones left behind cope far better than those who don’t benefit from prior arrangements to the death. 

I know this subject goes against our cultural grain, but we would be doing our loved ones a great favour if we did talk about death and dying and plan for our funerals. This is an act of love because it will be a considerable weight off our loved one’s shoulders when we die.

I’ve also met dozens of people who have been left in substantial financial debt, or their estate has been left in massive disarray due to a loved one’s death. If we love our loved ones, we will get our affairs in order not to overburden them at the time of our death.

I know death is not the best subject in the world, but it is a necessary one to be addressed calmly and naturally. None of us likes to think that one day we will be no more. However, the Christian hope is that that life will continue beyond this world, just in another form and in another dimension called heaven. Having this point of view and assurance that our life will continue after our death, life and death take on a completely different hue. No longer is death the scary big boogie man that must be ignored at all costs, but a fact of life that has hope for today and for an eternal future. 

  • ARE you nervous about the subject of death & dying?
  • Do you believe that there is life after life?
  • are you bereaved and finding it hard to cope?

📚Psalm 23 Unwrapped: Hope in difficult times

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 HOW to RENEW your Faith to CHANGE YOUR life.

Suffering and loss are hard to bear. As believers, when we go through these times, it is natural to question God. The patriarchs of the Bible certainly did. King David wrote many of the Psalms full of questions about what God is doing and why. However, it is worthy to note that David did not leave it there. He just did not complain and complain. No, when David complained, but ALWAYS ended in a statement of faith or praise.

It is not a sin to question. On the contrary, it is healthy to do so. God has not called us to unquestioning slavery but to living faith and freedom. If we are free, we can question. However, having said that, we cannot or should not ‘demand’ answers. God in his mercy may give us the answers but may not. When we love God and give our lives to him, we put him in control and make that choice. So, we choose for God to decide to answer us or not. After all, our Creator knows what is best for us, and maybe the silence of God in the short term may be precisely what is needed at the time. Maybe we need to learn to persevere or stay faithful even when we think God is not here.

You see, our growth as Christians is so significant to God. When my children were babies, I did everything to help them thrive because to keep them as babies would be a selfish and heinous act. So, it is with God our Father. It would be a heinous crime if God kept us as babies; we would never grow up in the faith if he did.

 God calls us to ‘give’ our mind, body, and soul to him to have the throne of our heart. We ask him to rule our emotions, thoughts, and overthrow anything that is not pleasing to him. This is the love of God- who gives us a choice.

 As for me- me and my household will serve the Lord.

The Problem of Suffering

If you’re not taught to endure Suffering, failures, losses when young, you may never learn it. Those who don’t learn it check out of life, addictions etc., etc. We need to accept that Suffering is part of life, and it’s not God who causes it. Yet, our culture does not embrace Suffering but rails against it. We develop a worldview that is primarily for our comfort.

Philippians 3:10 King James Version (KJV) That I may know him, and the power of his resurrection, and the fellowship of his sufferings, being made conformable unto his death.

The person who trusts the Creator no matter what an absolute assault on the worldview is that culture imposes upon us. Because it is a different way of thinking and living. Liberalism is called the calculative mind and does not liberate us but binds us to our senses. The Bible calls it the ‘mind of the flesh, and the apostle Paul calls it the ‘old man’. The egocentric mind interprets everything in the sense of personal advantage, which usually has a short-term effect. It says what’s in it for me, how would this situation be to my advantage what can I get out of it. In contrast, the person who trusts in the Lord says- what is in this for those I need to help- how can I do for others.

If you read everything from the small secular worldview and read everything methodically, you will not see things in a new way. Jesus teaches us a different way of seeing, perspective, advantage points, and a different starting point. Einstein said that the problem cannot be solved by the same mind/ or consciousness that caused it. It reads everything about personal advantage and cause and effect -we need to be bigger than that.

The Power of Contemplative Prayer

The word contemplation became popular through the works of Thomas Merton, which is reasonably recent. In the fifth 50s and 60s. A lot of people use the word meditation which is more or less the same thing. The word that most Christians are familiar with is the word prayer. But the word prayer has a different connotation to us here in the West than in the East where it originated from. In the West, prayer became something functional, something that produced an effect. It became – what’s in it for me! This is due to the idea that the ego is the centre of their universe. For example-

 It’s all about me. 

If I get offended, I’ll sue somebody

If someone hurts me, I’ll take revenge

If I don’t get what I want, I only react in some way.

If I can’t resolve the conflict ill just cut the people off. 

If someone has something that I want, I go out and get myself in debt to better it.

Western culture has taught us that – it’s All about me, the egocentric me. 

Sadly, this attitude has overlapped Christianity in a big way. So, when giving the Lord our all, we don’t know how to or even desire to.

Individualism rules and reigns in Christianity in the West, but this is not what Jesus intended, and it’s certainly not what he taught. As soon as you make prayer an exercise to get something, it puts you in charge. However, Jesus does say ask, and it will be given. We must be aware that this is from a humble and obedient submissive attitude towards Jesus Christ in the first place. This is nothing new it’s the same overall old mind or consciousness. How can I get God to do what I want him to do?

In their thinking, most people approach prayer with the attitude of-   I will try to get what I want from God. 

 However, this is not the way of faith- It is the way of the world. Worldly values have always been there but just manifests themselves differently according to popular culture at the time. In this way, instead of being a transformed mind or consciousness, we remain egocentric and try to manipulate God and everyone else and think we did okay. 

That’s why Christianity is in dire straits today because it’s not transforming people as the Bible clearly states that it should and does. It’s just giving people a form of religiosity to be in charge and control. It is still the ego/natural/fleshly/false self. Change begins with our choice- if we choose to allow God to change us- it will happen. 

Transforming not Conforming

What Jesus always talked about was the transformed self (John 3). The apostle Paul uses that beautiful phrase, it’s no longer their lives; Christ lives in me. It’s a different I; it’s a different sense of self. So, saying it’s not my ego-self or my false self that lives but Christ who lives in my true self. It is not my egocentric self that lives Christ that lives within my true redeemed self. As long as you’re operating from the egocentric will, you’ll never be free, and meditation/ contemplation would be almost impossible to maintain. 

The Problem with Religion

The ego-self can be pious, religious, theologically sound, and may even be a church leader somehow, but never totally free because operating in the small self. The result? Religion has always performed two very important but two very different functions. I am not talking about being a follower of Christ- but I am pointing out the problem with ‘religion’, which is very different.

1) Religion creates meaning by offering mixed tales, stories, narratives, questionable truths, laborious rituals, and revivals used together, gives some sort of meaning and purpose.

That’s okay, that’s how you get started; you’ve got to have an ego to get rid of one, and you have to have the self to move beyond the self.

2) Religion puts you on the hamster wheel of ritual and approval- a never-ending cycle.

There are many religious, moral, dedicated people with good upright values – however- most people do not go beyond that. There is no transformation of self.

This kind of religion does not raise or transform a person’s consciousness; it does not deliver true freedom where one can let go and let God. This type of religion does not transform or fully satisfy the true self. On the contrary, it fortifies the self, comforts the self, and even deceives this true self into thinking, you are okay – I’m okay.

Whereas underneath, there is this innate dissatisfaction, unrest and yearning for something more and not knowing what it is. Christianity is the best thing in the world and the worst in the world. Why? Religious people think they are always correct, and they start from that vantage point. When one thinks one is right, they become narrow-minded, intolerant of others and egocentric.

With egocentric people, it is difficult to get to know them because the ego is so sure that they are correct and will protect their point of view at any cost, even the cost of hurting others, and that’s where spiritual abuse occurs, and that is why I wrote a Master of Art Thesis on that subject as it’s so common in the churches- but that’s another subject. 

I will make my Thesis available on this website at a small cost- you can download it. It will be available here on this site by December 2021.

 The danger is that the egocentric self is warm and fed and thinks it is correct, so they are convinced they are saved. But what does save mean?

 Most people think that being saved is a ticket to heaven. Something that is not here now but will come one day. It’s always in the future. It’s by the sweet by and by. If I am religious enough, good enough, say the sinner’s prayer, and I do the right thing, then I’ll get to heaven, and that means that I’ll be saved. Does it?

This point of view comes from a punishment and reward system. If I play the game right, I will be rewarded. It is about the works that I can do, and God will be pleased, and I’ll get into heaven. And that point of view has absolutely nothing to do with transformation, absolutely nothing to do with the teachings of Jesus Christ. This, unfortunately, is most Christians point of view, but Jesus had something completely different in his mind when he spoke to Nicodemus, and we read in John chapter 3. So please turn to it and read the whole chapter.

Through contemplative prayer/meditation, we come into fellowship with God and not in fellowship with our own ego. We learn to be patient, wait upon the Lord to renew our strength, mount up with wings of eagles, and then and only then will we run and not be weary and then only then will we walk and not be faint. So, waiting upon the Lord, confessing our sins, and repenting (turning away from sin) is the basis of our contemplation and transformation.

 God is in the business of transforming you because he loves you. It starts with the renewing of your mind in Christ Jesus. Mindful contemplation is a life’s style that will help with this, and therefore this website exists.

 Romans 12:2 New International Version

Do not conform to the pattern of this world but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing, and perfect will.

( you may QUOTE any part of this article however, PLEASE correctly CITE any material used- thank you)

Just to Update You

25 years ago, I wrote 2 books when I lived in the USA. In 2021 I wrote 2 more which are available in Amazon. I am working on another about Holistic Living, which features Mindfulness and Faith which will be published and made available to you in 2022– – so keep a lookout for that!

If you struggle to make self-care a priority or do not know how to start your mindfulness journey, check out my course, available on Udemy, and very soon available on www.moonrosemindfulness.com.

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How to get through and recover from Burnout of Mind, Body & Spirit and Stay Sane!

I want to share with you in this post,  how I get through Burn out and stay sane. This is not the whole story but a snippet from my new book about Holistic Living, which features Mindfulness and issues around mental health. I am in the process of writing it. It will be published and made available to you later in the year – so keep a lookout for that!

Also, If you struggle to make self-care a priority or do not know how to start your holistic-mindfulness journey, check out my course, which will be available in the Summer of 2021- subscribe free to this blog to get updates on this! I am starting a new blog soon just dedicated to Holistic  mindfulness, so keep a look out for that going live!

Before the sun arise to greet the new day, I kneel once more upon my  bedside rug with my hands over my eyes, and pray: “Oh, Lord, let me feel at one with you, myself, and others. Let me perform my tasks with the motivation of hope, faith and love. May  grace be in my thoughts, actions and speech this day”.

To pray this prayer daily, is the only way I know to effectually get through and to recover from burn out.

My strength is so very  limited, but Gods strength is limitless, so I draw upon that in faith. I admire people who get through stuff all by themselves. They don’t seem to need God, people or any other intervention- they just get on with it successfully. But that’s not me. I know my weakness and limitations. I recognise that I  desperately  need the power of God in my life. The power of God is called the Holy Spirit who is part of the God head in Christ. The holy Spirit  is given to empowers us, to bring us through, so we can be witness of his love and grace.

That does not mean to say that I sit back and watch God magically work on my behalf. No Never!

But what I do is to submit myself in prayer like the one above, and go through my day knowing that I am not alone. Then I am diligent to learn and apply practical steps as listed below to help me. However,  the difference is that I go forward into my day Gods ability- in Gods power and strength to get through and recover from burn out.

How did I get burnt out if the first place if I trusted in God?

Well the answer is simple – I didn’t!

As a perfectionist, a high achiever, I expect far too much of myself. I don’t give my body, mind or spirit enough time out or flexibility in my tasks, it’s something I am still learning to do. God gives us time out, urging us to rest- it’s called the Sabbath. So having cleared that up, let’s have a little look at a few practical ways  to recover from and avoid burn out in the future.

1) Take the time to  pause and change direction by learning how you can help yourself overcome burnout and feel healthy and positive again.

FIRST-Adopt the three “R” approach:

Recognize. Watch for the warning signs of burnout. Be self-aware. Listen to your thoughts and words, notice you’re the way you approach actions.

Reverse. Undo the damage by seeking support and managing stress- this is what we are doing here now.

Resilience. Build your resilience to stress by taking care of your physical and emotional health.

SECOND – Learn strategies to do the three “3 R’s” that you are comfortable with.

In the next blog post I will list some strategies That I have found has helped me, and may be of help to you as well.

Thank you for visiting me here, I hope this post was helpful. If it was, I would love to hear from you. Feel free to contact me and share any thoughts you have. And if you enjoyed reading this blog, please support it by subscribing to my FREE newsletter and receive your FREE thankyou gift!

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I look forward to your visit to my next blog post!

Paula Rose Parish

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Traces of Grief

Do you see me_image

Traces of grief may always remain, it changed me,

                             the real victory is not in the deleting the effects,

                                                but in the triumphing over them.            Paula Rose-Parish

When we plan to take a journey of some kind, we take time to prepare. We are savvy travellers, so we ensure that we have our navigation tools in hand, ensuring that they work as they should. We then become familiar with them before we get on the road. The visit to the fuel station guarantees that we will complete our journey. If we don’t, there is a good chance of getting lost, taking a detour, or not getting to our intended destination at all. Now we have a goal, we have a plan, we are ready to begin our journey. Approach this chapter in this same way. Use it as a preparation for your journey through this book. It will get you started on the path to recovery. I write in a particular way, and in this chapter, I reveal why. The usage of the Psalm and my specific application of words are explained. When we are bereaved, we can get exhausted. Therefore, I want this journey through grief to be straightforward as it possibly can be for you.

I am a child of the 50s and have seen a lot of life. I’ve lived and worked in four countries and visited a whole lot of others. The journey through life, from the very beginning to end, make us who we are. I must have been about ten years old when my very favourite saying became ‘Good Grief Charlie Brown!’ I would say it all the time, and it became somewhat of a trademark for me, it was my catchphrase. I didn’t know that I had dyslexia (not diagnosed until in my late 40s). Dyslexia was unknown within the educational system at the time. Therefore, there was no provision for remedial teaching. Without the support I needed, I hadn’t read a book in full until I was well into my 20s. Reading exhausted me, so I gave up in the first few pages, unable to comprehend the storyline, context or the words. Thinking back, I seriously tried my hardest at school, but not everyone saw it that way. I could read a little bit, but not enough to keep up with my grades. My teachers reported to my parents that I was lazy, which would add to my overwhelming sense of failure. Tearfully I shouted, ‘I am trying, I just can’t read, I just can’t’, and they would fire back at me ‘there’s no such word as can’t’ and told me to try harder. I was doing so badly that I had to repeat grade two twice! Then I failed in every year of primary school as well. I didn’t have the grades I need to attend high school, but because I was older than my peers; I was ‘put up’ to secondary school – as they called it. To be expected, I was put in the lowest set. Having an awful time, I only lasted there for six months; leaving in favour of the workplace at the age of fifteen years old. Try as I might, I just didn’t get hold of what was going on in the classroom. I couldn’t follow the thread of ideas, and the bullies duly took advantage of my weakness.

On several occasions, a group of boys and girls were waiting for me at the school gate and chased me all the way home after roughing me up. Growing up in the Australian school system in the 1950s and 60s wasn’t easy. We had to be tough enough to defend ourselves when needed. And it would always help of course if you were a fast runner, and I was. My inferiority heightened when my classmates and family devoured books like they were going out of fashion. They would tell me how easy it was to read, so why couldn’t I? Feeling very alone and misunderstood, I began to withdraw into myself. No way would I visit the school library except for a compulsory session in class. I didn’t understand why I had to attend the library when I couldn’t read properly. The whole system confused me. I quickly became overwhelmed by the hundreds of books housed on myriads of intimidating shelves.

Then one day, while trying to avoid the bullies, and I found myself wandering into the school library, and it was there that I discovered a small book. It was brief enough that I managed to read it almost to the end. I loved that little book, with its cute cartoons on every page which portrayed the adventures of Charlie Brown. I liked Charlie, he was an unusual little boy, and I found that I could relate to him, bless him. In Charlie, there was a small reflection of myself. Like me, Charlie was of short stature, inconspicuous, ordinary, and unremarkable. And like me, he was misunderstood. Charlie had a habit of making silly mistakes, he would say stupid things and did things out of the ordinary, and that is when his friends would exclaim, Good Grief Charlie Brown! I definitely could relate to him.

I suffered my first real experience of grief when I split from my fiancé of three years. I was still saying ‘good grief’ as my catchphrasebut now I knew that grief had nothing GOOD about it. In the end, my favourite little motto became a thing of the past -sorry Charlie! Whether it’s death, divorce a job loss or anything else that causes us to grieve, all are difficult to cope with. Whatever the circumstances, grief forces us to say goodbye to someone or something we hold dear. Grieving is such a personal and individual thing; we all experience it in our own way. I remember the sorrow I felt when I left my home country of Australia, creating a new home overseas. The anguish of saying goodbye to family. My obligations in ministry took me around the world, so I repeatedly had to leave dear friends behind, and sadness became a familiar figure. I was living 15,000 miles away from Australia, when my mother, who lived there died. I felt sad when I couldn’t be with her in her last days. The sorrow deepened when I couldn’t help my sisters to care for our aged Dad – there’s nothing good about grief.

You, Will, Have Troubles

  I share a little my own story throughout this book, so you know that you are not alone in this. I want you to see that there is someone who can empathise. My purpose is to help you understand your own Troubles and learn to manage them, so you can live a happy and fulfilling life. No real language exists, that clearly expresses the reality of the deep pain of grief. In 1976 I came to faith in Christ and began to attend church and was told by well-meaning people, that all my problems have ended.

I believed them. They assured me that I had found a trouble-free life! It wasn’t long before I found out that this idea was terribly dishonest. When the problems began, I was convinced that something was wrong with me. This wasn’t supposed to happen! Discouraged and very confused, I believed that I must have done something wrong, it was my fault somehow. I already had low self-esteem, and this only compounded my sense of helplessness and hopelessness. My God encounter was genuine. I hung on tightly to that experience as the turmoil swirled around me. I began to research God’s word for myself and found the truth of the matter. What I was told was a lie, things do go wrong for people of faith. Bad things happen to good people. And that is OK, that’s life! Every human being on the planet lives through sorrow in different ways and measures, and always will. You can imagine my relief to find this was nothing unusual and that there was nothing wrong with me after all. Many teachings in the Scriptures point out that we will have troubles in this life, especially if we follow Christ closely as His disciples.  Don’t be surprised by what you are experiencing, God is with you. The real problem arises when we don’t know what to do with our troubles. We wonder how on earth will we get through this! And how do we survive this phase of mourning, and not allow it to immobilise us in some way? How can we make sense of what is happening?

 In God’s Name

To be able to embrace God as a friend as we journey through the valley of the shadow, we need to identify who God actually is. One of the ways we do this is by looking into His Name. This is because God’s Name reveals His character, intention, and fundamental nature. When we name our children, we give them a first and surname, and sometimes more. And we often don’t consider what the meaning of it may be. However, this rule does not apply to God. Meanings of names are particularly important. The babies of the bible were named according to the particular meaning of that name.  Some people may not realise it but, there is no first name or surname that is applied to the Creator of the Universe. God is not a John or an Eric or even a Fred, for example. But what we believe are names for God are actually descriptions of Gods nature, character, and actions. For instance, Jehovah-Raah, which means The Lord, my Shepherd. A shepherd is a role description, not a name of a person. Jehovah is not a name either. Translated as The Existing One or Lord. So again, it describes who God is. Also, it suggests becoming or specifically to become known. This implies that God always discloses who He is. A shepherd is the one who feeds or leads his flock to pasture (Ezekiel 34:11-15). An extended translation is a friend or companion. This indicates the intimacy that God desires between Himself and His people and can be understood as The Lord, my Friend. Untangling the Name like this reveals to us that God is our friend, guide, companion and is the ever-existing One. The One who loves and cares for His sheep. The Lord, my Shepherd.and we see who God is in the Good Shepherd who is Jesus Christ.

💗xx

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          info@paularoseparishministries.org

                        

Jonah and Me

 

Jonah and the whale is a strange- tale indeed. It has mostly been relegated to the category of myth were exciting children books emerge from. You know the story well, so I won’t elaborate here.

But Jonah is an important story for us to understand. Why? Because it is all about You and Me. It’s about how we behave towards God and to those around us. And of course, we would never have such a dramatic experience as Jonah, but each of us has our fair share of times when we run away from Gods love and presence and find ourselves in some sticky situation. We can break fellowship with God, but we can never break our relationship- he is our Father and therefore,  he will never give up on us, but always draws us back to himself. So, Jonah has much to teach us.

The prince of preachers Charles Haddon Spurgeon once said: what is the use of grace which I profess to have received which leaves me exactly the same sort of person as I was before I received it? A faith that does not lead to a drastic change of behaviour, will never lead to a change of destiny.

Jonah had to be brought down to the depths to understand the love, holiness and grace of God and how much he values others even when they were immoral, for his destiny to change and that of others. And God wanted Jonah to value the sinful folk of Nineveh, by warning them of impending doom, so they could be saved. How wonderful the grace of God!

Jonah’s’ behaviour was unkind, judgemental and selfish and did not match the behaviour of his benevolent God.  So, God in his mercy brought Jonah back to into fellowship to himself using adverse circumstances.

I am awaiting a knee replacement and having cortisone injections under my knee cap to reduce swelling and pain. Years as a sportswoman is now catching up with me. I morn at times for the freedom in mobility I once had, however, I have and still learning lessons about God and myself due to my malaise. And I have to say, I am glad that when I wake up each day and journey through my day that I call out to God through Christ to help me get through it according to his will. And you know what? -he does, the power of the Spirit is there. My adverse situation has made me realise things about myself that I would have never encountered had my knee and shoulder (and feet) been whole. Its all about behaviour. The children of God will reflect the nature of their Father. And adverse situations, if we allow them, will do just that.

If you are struggling with your faith or a difficult situation, and you would like support and prayer, please contact on at me and we will chat over a coffee.

In the meantime, avoid whales!

God bless,

Rev Paula